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Some personality traits more likely to cause a divorce

Most of our readers in Florida have heard the common refrain that half of all marriages end in divorce. The validity of that supposed statistic has been called into question in recent years, but there is no doubt that most people probably know a friend or family member who has gone through a divorce case. Are there certain personality traits that may make it more likely for a person to end up in a divorce?

Dispelling the myths of Florida divorces

There are some people in our state who are in an unhappy marriage and may be contemplating filing for divorce. However, for some of those people, there are impediments to taking the actual step of pursuing a divorce, namely certain "myths" about divorce and the legal process that is involved. Dispelling those myths can give people the information they need to make the right decisions.

How will a divorce impact your finances?

Many of our readers in the Tampa area know that a divorce can result in a significant impact on finances, for both spouses who go through the process. In fact, the financial aspect of a divorce is why many couples try very hard to work through their marriage issues. However, some people may not realize that the financial impact of a divorce can be greater for those who are older - the so-called "grey" divorces.

Age differences when it comes to the rate of divorce in America

Some of our readers in Florida may have seen news reports in recent years that generational shifts in thinking about relationships and marriage is having an impact on the divorce rate in America. Many of these reports note that the younger generation among us - so-called "millennials" - are waiting longer to get married, are staying in devoted dating relationships longer before getting married and, in general, are more financially secure prior to getting married than older generations might have been. The result? The overall divorce rate in America is declining, with one recent report noting that the divorce rate in our country is at its lowest point in the last 40 years.

Important factors to understand regarding alimony awards

Not every Florida divorce will result in an award of alimony. Alimony is generally only ordered when one of the parties to a divorcing couple is financially unable to provide for their own needs following the end of their marriage. As previously discussed on this blog, alimony can take on different forms depending upon the needs of the receiving party and the capacity of the paying party to support them.

How long does a child support obligation last?

Although a divorce ends the legal relationship between two people, Florida residents who were previously married may find themselves tied together by shared responsibilities that survive the end of their union. This is generally the case when the parties had children together who require custodial and financial care in the wake of their parents' divorce. For some parents required to pay child support, that responsibility can last for a very long time.

What kinds of alimony are available in Florida?

Most people think of alimony as the monthly payment of money from a person to their former spouse. While this is how some alimony arrangements work, alimony can look very different based on the needs of the involved parties. This post will discuss some of the forms that alimony can take on in Florida; however, it does not offer legal advice but provides information about alimony options in Florida. The facts and circumstances of different divorce cases will greatly impact if alimony is awarded and what form it will take on.

Planning for divorce in the New Year

A Tampa resident may resolve to live a happier life once the clock strikes midnight on New Year's Eve. They may make plans to increase the joy that they experience each day, and these plans may involve making small and big changes to the way they approach life. For some, living a happier life may mean slowing down to appreciate what they have. For others, it may mean altering the fundamental relationships that they have with others, putting themselves in a more positive space for living.

Can a non-custodial parent abduct their own child?

Child custody disputes can be intense. While some parents are able to put their differences aside and make good choices about the health and welfare of their shared children, others cannot get past their disagreements with their former partners and, instead, take actions that may be detrimental to their kids. Parents in Florida can be accused of abducting their own children if their actions violate the custody and visitation agreements and orders that govern their family relations.

Don't Fight Alone

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